landscape + ecology
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 The subject of walking has led me through the explorative measures of a design exercise focusing on the North Norfolk Coast. Under layers of Ramsar, Natura 2000, Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), National Nature Reserve, and Heritage Coastline, lie 3400 hectare of salt marsh, intertidal mud flats, young chalk and clay cliffs, and stony shingle beaches.  Choosing three small sites along this expanse allowed me to explore three different landscape typologies with a sought and determined cohesive design language.    The work was notioned to be particularly about ways to use and understand a site.  Therefore, the proposed interventions are meant to be intimate and at a human scale. This ensured an understanding between plan view and the walker perspective.  This design exercise also explored rural forms of walking and hiking and urban expressions of walking, historically seen in esplanades and boulevards.  Alice Foxley, formerly of Günther Vogt’s studio, described the “shape of the walk” – the journey, unfolding in linear time as moving…"representing origin, destination and station; approach, encounter, and departure; sequence and rhythm" in their 2012 publication,  Distance & Engagement.   This became an integral theoretical approach to my design exercise.  Additionally, Rebecca Solnit’s writings engaged me further into concepts of feminist theory on walking, personal freedom and expression in walking, as well as meditation and contemplation in walking – suitably addressed in her unpacking of Wordsworth.  Finally, I conceived through Richard Long's early works that history of personal landscape resonate appointed value in our collective memory of a site.  I was interested in approaching that as a design solution in celebration of working landscape and seaside found amongst the romantic solitude and landscape textures.   Five, six, pick up sticks, seven, eight, lay them straight  (1980) expresses a walks ability to mark history onto the land. Pathways and bridges, whether literally or symbolically, become principal unifying elements. With the use of boardwalk, steps, and viewing platforms – for nature observation and contemplation – a new landscape was formed, equally powerful in its intimacy as it is in its expansiveness and in its drama.    As I walk and will continue to walk through our regional landscapes, I hope to communicate geology, geography, ecology, time and distance to make "good work" as Long put, as the "right thing in the right places at the right time."  A crossing place, I interpret these thresholds, and the passage itself, just as I would the drawing on the page.

The subject of walking has led me through the explorative measures of a design exercise focusing on the North Norfolk Coast. Under layers of Ramsar, Natura 2000, Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), National Nature Reserve, and Heritage Coastline, lie 3400 hectare of salt marsh, intertidal mud flats, young chalk and clay cliffs, and stony shingle beaches.  Choosing three small sites along this expanse allowed me to explore three different landscape typologies with a sought and determined cohesive design language.  

The work was notioned to be particularly about ways to use and understand a site.  Therefore, the proposed interventions are meant to be intimate and at a human scale. This ensured an understanding between plan view and the walker perspective.  This design exercise also explored rural forms of walking and hiking and urban expressions of walking, historically seen in esplanades and boulevards.  Alice Foxley, formerly of Günther Vogt’s studio, described the “shape of the walk” – the journey, unfolding in linear time as moving…"representing origin, destination and station; approach, encounter, and departure; sequence and rhythm" in their 2012 publication, Distance & Engagement.  This became an integral theoretical approach to my design exercise.  Additionally, Rebecca Solnit’s writings engaged me further into concepts of feminist theory on walking, personal freedom and expression in walking, as well as meditation and contemplation in walking – suitably addressed in her unpacking of Wordsworth.

Finally, I conceived through Richard Long's early works that history of personal landscape resonate appointed value in our collective memory of a site.  I was interested in approaching that as a design solution in celebration of working landscape and seaside found amongst the romantic solitude and landscape textures.  Five, six, pick up sticks, seven, eight, lay them straight (1980) expresses a walks ability to mark history onto the land. Pathways and bridges, whether literally or symbolically, become principal unifying elements. With the use of boardwalk, steps, and viewing platforms – for nature observation and contemplation – a new landscape was formed, equally powerful in its intimacy as it is in its expansiveness and in its drama.  

As I walk and will continue to walk through our regional landscapes, I hope to communicate geology, geography, ecology, time and distance to make "good work" as Long put, as the "right thing in the right places at the right time."  A crossing place, I interpret these thresholds, and the passage itself, just as I would the drawing on the page.

  Stiffkey 1:500      Stiffkey coastal salt marshes are considered to be the finest in Britain. It is just one piece in an important wetland complex of inter-tidal sand flats, mudflats, salt marshes, shingle banks, sand dunes, brackish lagoons and reed beds comprising the North Norfolk coastline. This ancient marsh is apart of an expansive coastal landscape under many layers of important protective conservation legislation. They include, but are not limited to: Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), Ramsar, Natura 2000, National Nature by the National Trust.   Stiffkey Saltmarshes is as imaginable —quite remote. An informal car park extends the edge of the marsh as Greenway, a small lane, terminates. Bird watchers can dominate the path, taking up the entire width of the path with photography equipment during high tide when access into the marsh is limited. A natural low ridge rising land between the marsh and the hedges of enclosed agricultural land beyond exists as a parcel just next to the entrance of the Stiffkey Saltmarsh car park.  An oak wood, Coneyford Plantation, appears on nineteenth century maps atop the southern most portion of this ridge. A stacked viewing platform built off the internal staircase is proposed utilsing this natural landform. From this vantage point, the extent of the boardwalk extending into the marsh following disused infrastructure can be seen.

Stiffkey 1:500

 

Stiffkey coastal salt marshes are considered to be the finest in Britain. It is just one piece in an important wetland complex of inter-tidal sand flats, mudflats, salt marshes, shingle banks, sand dunes, brackish lagoons and reed beds comprising the North Norfolk coastline. This ancient marsh is apart of an expansive coastal landscape under many layers of important protective conservation legislation. They include, but are not limited to: Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), Ramsar, Natura 2000, National Nature by the National Trust. 

Stiffkey Saltmarshes is as imaginable —quite remote. An informal car park extends the edge of the marsh as Greenway, a small lane, terminates. Bird watchers can dominate the path, taking up the entire width of the path with photography equipment during high tide when access into the marsh is limited. A natural low ridge rising land between the marsh and the hedges of enclosed agricultural land beyond exists as a parcel just next to the entrance of the Stiffkey Saltmarsh car park.

An oak wood, Coneyford Plantation, appears on nineteenth century maps atop the southern most portion of this ridge. A stacked viewing platform built off the internal staircase is proposed utilsing this natural landform. From this vantage point, the extent of the boardwalk extending into the marsh following disused infrastructure can be seen.

  Stiffkey, Section through car park

Stiffkey, Section through car park

  Sheringham 1:500   The design approach for the Sheringham site is pressed to keep an edge between where the coastal path meets The Esplanade. Its threshold is formalised with a long beech hedge. It is screened with the tall lines of  P. tremula  with anticipation of a gardens room for the lido, restored to a bathing facility.  As the walk on the coast path here is tight between hedges and cliff edge, between golf course and sea, views are obscured in places, expansive in others. Emerging from the hedge layer, a slight corner turned, a degree more inland, a sudden openness looking directly the lido. Exactly opposite of the Victorian modesty of bathing machines, a rambler enters this intimate moment.  An uncomfortable belly flop, smacking stomach to water. You cringe, but you laugh. Its a moment. A viewing platform directs you back to the sea. You are facing North. Its repose for the community who has not travelled far. We remind ourselves we live on an island.  Taller screens of beech hedge and aspen line the perimeter, pinching the threshold even tighter. The repetition of  P. tremula  ‘Erecta’ visually structures the walk’s transition into the municipal park. The rural walk has changed temperature. It is no longer remote. The walk is still between land and sea and bound to its edge; a slower walk occurs. Time and distance has changed. An extension at the lido suspends visitors over the beach. A return to the seaside, a viewing platform brings back vitality of the architectural relics of the Victorian age.  The coast garden has memorised its surrounding extent; its landscape. It transitions between the two prominent ecologies of the Norfolk coast. It changes from acid grassland and salt marsh to calcareous meadow.  Where the chalk surfaces, the meadow profits.

Sheringham 1:500

The design approach for the Sheringham site is pressed to keep an edge between where the coastal path meets The Esplanade. Its threshold is formalised with a long beech hedge. It is screened with the tall lines of P. tremula with anticipation of a gardens room for the lido, restored to a bathing facility.

As the walk on the coast path here is tight between hedges and cliff edge, between golf course and sea, views are obscured in places, expansive in others. Emerging from the hedge layer, a slight corner turned, a degree more inland, a sudden openness looking directly the lido. Exactly opposite of the Victorian modesty of bathing machines, a rambler enters this intimate moment.  An uncomfortable belly flop, smacking stomach to water. You cringe, but you laugh. Its a moment. A viewing platform directs you back to the sea. You are facing North. Its repose for the community who has not travelled far. We remind ourselves we live on an island.

Taller screens of beech hedge and aspen line the perimeter, pinching the threshold even tighter. The repetition of P. tremula ‘Erecta’ visually structures the walk’s transition into the municipal park. The rural walk has changed temperature. It is no longer remote. The walk is still between land and sea and bound to its edge; a slower walk occurs. Time and distance has changed. An extension at the lido suspends visitors over the beach. A return to the seaside, a viewing platform brings back vitality of the architectural relics of the Victorian age.

The coast garden has memorised its surrounding extent; its landscape. It transitions between the two prominent ecologies of the Norfolk coast. It changes from acid grassland and salt marsh to calcareous meadow.  Where the chalk surfaces, the meadow profits.

  Section, Section through restored lido and viewing platform   Sheringham’s coastal landscape is a working landscape. The Esplanade was built for leisure and recreation during the Victorian Age. With the series of groynes, shingle has accumulated and the cliff faces are most dramatically altered here.  The Norfolk Coast Path crosses the Esplanade and changes character dramatically at this threshold. From Sheringham to Cromer the walk switches from cliff walk to beach and diverts at places further away from the sea where development has cut contiguous crossing.

Section, Section through restored lido and viewing platform

Sheringham’s coastal landscape is a working landscape. The Esplanade was built for leisure and recreation during the Victorian Age. With the series of groynes, shingle has accumulated and the cliff faces are most dramatically altered here.

The Norfolk Coast Path crosses the Esplanade and changes character dramatically at this threshold. From Sheringham to Cromer the walk switches from cliff walk to beach and diverts at places further away from the sea where development has cut contiguous crossing.

  Sheringham, Axonometric rendering   Sheringham, of medieval origins, is the train line terminus linking the coast to Norwich, the county’s urban core. It was once a small fishing village and now has grown to roughly 7,000. The municipal park in Sheringham at The Esplanade overlook links the three sites together as a destination place formalising the approaches to walking the coast and preserving the social and cultural heritages of the coastline villages.

Sheringham, Axonometric rendering

Sheringham, of medieval origins, is the train line terminus linking the coast to Norwich, the county’s urban core. It was once a small fishing village and now has grown to roughly 7,000. The municipal park in Sheringham at The Esplanade overlook links the three sites together as a destination place formalising the approaches to walking the coast and preserving the social and cultural heritages of the coastline villages.

  Sheringham, Coast garden and restored lido      Some walks are spent looking down.  Coast Garden is slowly decaying groynes delineating the horizonality of the sea landscape. It is driftwood. It is the stones you skip. The tired yawns of moorings. Steel in salt.  The combination of untreated larch timber planks, Corten corrugated weathering steel strips, and flint stones provide textural elements in the garden during dormant periods. They also function for the gardeners. Users may wander into the garden with use of these plank. This combination of materials provide architectural interest in the garden as well as utility. These elements are laid next between the borders of the calcareous grassland soil and the more acidic clay soils for the limonium planting and woodland. It is the washed beach.

Sheringham, Coast garden and restored lido

 

Some walks are spent looking down.

Coast Garden is slowly decaying groynes delineating the horizonality of the sea landscape. It is driftwood. It is the stones you skip. The tired yawns of moorings. Steel in salt.

The combination of untreated larch timber planks, Corten corrugated weathering steel strips, and flint stones provide textural elements in the garden during dormant periods. They also function for the gardeners. Users may wander into the garden with use of these plank. This combination of materials provide architectural interest in the garden as well as utility. These elements are laid next between the borders of the calcareous grassland soil and the more acidic clay soils for the limonium planting and woodland. It is the washed beach.

  Sheringham, Coast garden plant schedule & soil construction   Broadcast seed for Gravel path as same method as Calcareous Grassland Seed Mix covering area closer to planting bed for sporatic gravel planting effect as roughly shown on plan. Gravel path inaccessible during growth establishment period (8-15 months). After which desire lines established by users will then describe the exact path edge and planting bed. Further amelioration of planting quantities will be judged based on widths of paths created by users. Furture maintainence will enhance sporatic established planting areas outside the formal planting bed border.   Digitalis ferruginea  (Rusty foxglove) prefers a slightly acidic soil and a light canopy cover, but will tolerate alkaline soils and full sun. The basal leaves are attractive rosettes, mildly hardy. Here, a second planting of  D. ferruginea  in year two of establishment is recommended to ensure an annual flowering display of this species.

Sheringham, Coast garden plant schedule & soil construction

Broadcast seed for Gravel path as same method as Calcareous Grassland Seed Mix covering area closer to planting bed for sporatic gravel planting effect as roughly shown on plan. Gravel path inaccessible during growth establishment period (8-15 months). After which desire lines established by users will then describe the exact path edge and planting bed. Further amelioration of planting quantities will be judged based on widths of paths created by users. Furture maintainence will enhance sporatic established planting areas outside the formal planting bed border.

Digitalis ferruginea (Rusty foxglove) prefers a slightly acidic soil and a light canopy cover, but will tolerate alkaline soils and full sun. The basal leaves are attractive rosettes, mildly hardy. Here, a second planting of D. ferruginea in year two of establishment is recommended to ensure an annual flowering display of this species.

  Sheringham, Coastal garden landscape plan & bloom schedule   The Coast Garden is reminiscent of calcareous grasslands, salt marsh, and woodland found along the North Norfolk Coast. The garden is the short grasslands that grow on the chalk escarpments found south of Sheringham; the swathes of sea lavender which follow you for miles at Stiffkey Saltmarsh; hedgerow & woodland edge, woody vegetation bounding the coast line delineating the wild and the tamed. It acts as a formalisation of the natural plant communities which thrive under harsh conditions living on the North Sea.

Sheringham, Coastal garden landscape plan & bloom schedule

The Coast Garden is reminiscent of calcareous grasslands, salt marsh, and woodland found along the North Norfolk Coast. The garden is the short grasslands that grow on the chalk escarpments found south of Sheringham; the swathes of sea lavender which follow you for miles at Stiffkey Saltmarsh; hedgerow & woodland edge, woody vegetation bounding the coast line delineating the wild and the tamed. It acts as a formalisation of the natural plant communities which thrive under harsh conditions living on the North Sea.

    Repeating design elements cohesively narrate walking the Norfolk Coast Path.  Seating elements link the three sites along the coast path.   Untreated Scottish larch timber boards provides a grey patina over time.  This material will age suitably into the North Norfolk coastal landscape.

 

Repeating design elements cohesively narrate walking the Norfolk Coast Path.  Seating elements link the three sites along the coast path. 

Untreated Scottish larch timber boards provides a grey patina over time.  This material will age suitably into the North Norfolk coastal landscape.

construction_drawing3.jpg
  Overstrand, 1:500      In the later part of the 19th century right up to the 1930’s Overstrand was the most fashionable place to be, especially in the warm months. It became known as an English beach resort for the wealthy and elite. Winston Churchill spent summers in Overstrand. It has a luxurious history, but also a fishing village history as well.  A linkage to the east of Overstrand at the site of the land slippage is quite narrow, slight, barely existent. The terrain allows users to traverse into the dip of the slippage for a few meters down and across. Stepping stones have been placed. A bridge, conceptually or actual is proposed for this site.  Plantings adding the coastal stabilisation is also proposed. Native trees are suggested to be planted into the concrete of the previous road, leading to the beach Promenade, will add a distinguished architecturally designed response to coastal erosion without engineering solutions.  At the east end of the Overstrand beach, where my design proposal lies, the site has been designated as an experimental coastal erosion defence site. The sea defences includes; riprap,a revetment and wooden groynes. The groynes themselves essentially take up Overstrand’s entire coastline. The coastline becomes non contiguous and is not easily accessible to all members of the public. Steep steps and stiles are the only way to traverse over or around the groynes themselves. They are probably the only particularly interesting designed engineering solution evident in this particular landscape.

Overstrand, 1:500

 

In the later part of the 19th century right up to the 1930’s Overstrand was the most fashionable place to be, especially in the warm months. It became known as an English beach resort for the wealthy and elite. Winston Churchill spent summers in Overstrand. It has a luxurious history, but also a fishing village history as well.

A linkage to the east of Overstrand at the site of the land slippage is quite narrow, slight, barely existent. The terrain allows users to traverse into the dip of the slippage for a few meters down and across. Stepping stones have been placed. A bridge, conceptually or actual is proposed for this site.

Plantings adding the coastal stabilisation is also proposed. Native trees are suggested to be planted into the concrete of the previous road, leading to the beach Promenade, will add a distinguished architecturally designed response to coastal erosion without engineering solutions.

At the east end of the Overstrand beach, where my design proposal lies, the site has been designated as an experimental coastal erosion defence site. The sea defences includes; riprap,a revetment and wooden groynes. The groynes themselves essentially take up Overstrand’s entire coastline. The coastline becomes non contiguous and is not easily accessible to all members of the public. Steep steps and stiles are the only way to traverse over or around the groynes themselves. They are probably the only particularly interesting designed engineering solution evident in this particular landscape.

  Overstrand, Illustrative section

Overstrand, Illustrative section

 Overstrand's Clifton Way leading to Coast Road lost footing from land slippage at least twice in the last hundred years . The structural geology is ancient lake clays with staked glacial materials.  The fist occurrence devoured the remains of the Overstrand Hotel in 1947.  A sound slippage, a very active landslip, developed in the 1990s.  Geoengineered, stabilisation was fitted by regrading the slope and installing coastal defaces to protect the nearby residential cluster.  Bolstering the foot of the cliff with large rip rap laced at the bottom of the slope currently prevents free circulation across the beach, unless traversing at low tide.  The Overstrand to Walcott Site for Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) designated o this parcel is considered partially degraded due the coast erosion defences in place.  Linking very loosely Victorian invention and its ornate design sense, the function of a truss bridge as scaffolding is conceptually envisioned.  The stairs themselves are reminiscent of the previous topographical profile.   Additionally, if substantial erosion continued to occur, the staircase would remain as an architectural relic denoting lines of the previous topography.  IT would remain as a function observation viewing platform.  Can Victorian engineering anticipate change in the temporality of the landscape and stifle function in future?  Does the ornate nature of the truss supports overemphasise the degree of certainty one needs to traverse the potential future promontory?

Overstrand's Clifton Way leading to Coast Road lost footing from land slippage at least twice in the last hundred years . The structural geology is ancient lake clays with staked glacial materials.  The fist occurrence devoured the remains of the Overstrand Hotel in 1947.  A sound slippage, a very active landslip, developed in the 1990s.  Geoengineered, stabilisation was fitted by regrading the slope and installing coastal defaces to protect the nearby residential cluster.  Bolstering the foot of the cliff with large rip rap laced at the bottom of the slope currently prevents free circulation across the beach, unless traversing at low tide.  The Overstrand to Walcott Site for Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) designated o this parcel is considered partially degraded due the coast erosion defences in place.

Linking very loosely Victorian invention and its ornate design sense, the function of a truss bridge as scaffolding is conceptually envisioned.  The stairs themselves are reminiscent of the previous topographical profile. 

Additionally, if substantial erosion continued to occur, the staircase would remain as an architectural relic denoting lines of the previous topography.  IT would remain as a function observation viewing platform.  Can Victorian engineering anticipate change in the temporality of the landscape and stifle function in future?  Does the ornate nature of the truss supports overemphasise the degree of certainty one needs to traverse the potential future promontory?

    Yorkshire boarding is a typical cladding used for barns. The spacing is ideal for ventilation and light for farm animals. There are many farms in Norfolk so this makes a suitable choice blending with the working landscape vernacular. The transparency of the material due to the 50mm gaps in the cladding will take weight off the object. When the sun is heavy in the sky, the staircase will have the potential to be illuminated through the cladding.

 

Yorkshire boarding is a typical cladding used for barns. The spacing is ideal for ventilation and light for farm animals. There are many farms in Norfolk so this makes a suitable choice blending with the working landscape vernacular. The transparency of the material due to the 50mm gaps in the cladding will take weight off the object. When the sun is heavy in the sky, the staircase will have the potential to be illuminated through the cladding.

  Overstrand, View top formal garden

Overstrand, View top formal garden

The subject of walking has led me through the explorative measures of a design exercise focusing on the North Norfolk Coast. Under layers of Ramsar, Natura 2000, Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), National Nature Reserve, and Heritage Coastline, lie 3400 hectare of salt marsh, intertidal mud flats, young chalk and clay cliffs, and stony shingle beaches.  Choosing three small sites along this expanse allowed me to explore three different landscape typologies with a sought and determined cohesive design language.  

The work was notioned to be particularly about ways to use and understand a site.  Therefore, the proposed interventions are meant to be intimate and at a human scale. This ensured an understanding between plan view and the walker perspective.  This design exercise also explored rural forms of walking and hiking and urban expressions of walking, historically seen in esplanades and boulevards.  Alice Foxley, formerly of Günther Vogt’s studio, described the “shape of the walk” – the journey, unfolding in linear time as moving…"representing origin, destination and station; approach, encounter, and departure; sequence and rhythm" in their 2012 publication, Distance & Engagement.  This became an integral theoretical approach to my design exercise.  Additionally, Rebecca Solnit’s writings engaged me further into concepts of feminist theory on walking, personal freedom and expression in walking, as well as meditation and contemplation in walking – suitably addressed in her unpacking of Wordsworth.

Finally, I conceived through Richard Long's early works that history of personal landscape resonate appointed value in our collective memory of a site.  I was interested in approaching that as a design solution in celebration of working landscape and seaside found amongst the romantic solitude and landscape textures.  Five, six, pick up sticks, seven, eight, lay them straight (1980) expresses a walks ability to mark history onto the land. Pathways and bridges, whether literally or symbolically, become principal unifying elements. With the use of boardwalk, steps, and viewing platforms – for nature observation and contemplation – a new landscape was formed, equally powerful in its intimacy as it is in its expansiveness and in its drama.  

As I walk and will continue to walk through our regional landscapes, I hope to communicate geology, geography, ecology, time and distance to make "good work" as Long put, as the "right thing in the right places at the right time."  A crossing place, I interpret these thresholds, and the passage itself, just as I would the drawing on the page.

Stiffkey 1:500

 

Stiffkey coastal salt marshes are considered to be the finest in Britain. It is just one piece in an important wetland complex of inter-tidal sand flats, mudflats, salt marshes, shingle banks, sand dunes, brackish lagoons and reed beds comprising the North Norfolk coastline. This ancient marsh is apart of an expansive coastal landscape under many layers of important protective conservation legislation. They include, but are not limited to: Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), Ramsar, Natura 2000, National Nature by the National Trust. 

Stiffkey Saltmarshes is as imaginable —quite remote. An informal car park extends the edge of the marsh as Greenway, a small lane, terminates. Bird watchers can dominate the path, taking up the entire width of the path with photography equipment during high tide when access into the marsh is limited. A natural low ridge rising land between the marsh and the hedges of enclosed agricultural land beyond exists as a parcel just next to the entrance of the Stiffkey Saltmarsh car park.

An oak wood, Coneyford Plantation, appears on nineteenth century maps atop the southern most portion of this ridge. A stacked viewing platform built off the internal staircase is proposed utilsing this natural landform. From this vantage point, the extent of the boardwalk extending into the marsh following disused infrastructure can be seen.

Stiffkey, Section through car park

Sheringham 1:500

The design approach for the Sheringham site is pressed to keep an edge between where the coastal path meets The Esplanade. Its threshold is formalised with a long beech hedge. It is screened with the tall lines of P. tremula with anticipation of a gardens room for the lido, restored to a bathing facility.

As the walk on the coast path here is tight between hedges and cliff edge, between golf course and sea, views are obscured in places, expansive in others. Emerging from the hedge layer, a slight corner turned, a degree more inland, a sudden openness looking directly the lido. Exactly opposite of the Victorian modesty of bathing machines, a rambler enters this intimate moment.  An uncomfortable belly flop, smacking stomach to water. You cringe, but you laugh. Its a moment. A viewing platform directs you back to the sea. You are facing North. Its repose for the community who has not travelled far. We remind ourselves we live on an island.

Taller screens of beech hedge and aspen line the perimeter, pinching the threshold even tighter. The repetition of P. tremula ‘Erecta’ visually structures the walk’s transition into the municipal park. The rural walk has changed temperature. It is no longer remote. The walk is still between land and sea and bound to its edge; a slower walk occurs. Time and distance has changed. An extension at the lido suspends visitors over the beach. A return to the seaside, a viewing platform brings back vitality of the architectural relics of the Victorian age.

The coast garden has memorised its surrounding extent; its landscape. It transitions between the two prominent ecologies of the Norfolk coast. It changes from acid grassland and salt marsh to calcareous meadow.  Where the chalk surfaces, the meadow profits.

Section, Section through restored lido and viewing platform

Sheringham’s coastal landscape is a working landscape. The Esplanade was built for leisure and recreation during the Victorian Age. With the series of groynes, shingle has accumulated and the cliff faces are most dramatically altered here.

The Norfolk Coast Path crosses the Esplanade and changes character dramatically at this threshold. From Sheringham to Cromer the walk switches from cliff walk to beach and diverts at places further away from the sea where development has cut contiguous crossing.

Sheringham, Axonometric rendering

Sheringham, of medieval origins, is the train line terminus linking the coast to Norwich, the county’s urban core. It was once a small fishing village and now has grown to roughly 7,000. The municipal park in Sheringham at The Esplanade overlook links the three sites together as a destination place formalising the approaches to walking the coast and preserving the social and cultural heritages of the coastline villages.

Sheringham, Coast garden and restored lido

 

Some walks are spent looking down.

Coast Garden is slowly decaying groynes delineating the horizonality of the sea landscape. It is driftwood. It is the stones you skip. The tired yawns of moorings. Steel in salt.

The combination of untreated larch timber planks, Corten corrugated weathering steel strips, and flint stones provide textural elements in the garden during dormant periods. They also function for the gardeners. Users may wander into the garden with use of these plank. This combination of materials provide architectural interest in the garden as well as utility. These elements are laid next between the borders of the calcareous grassland soil and the more acidic clay soils for the limonium planting and woodland. It is the washed beach.

Sheringham, Coast garden plant schedule & soil construction

Broadcast seed for Gravel path as same method as Calcareous Grassland Seed Mix covering area closer to planting bed for sporatic gravel planting effect as roughly shown on plan. Gravel path inaccessible during growth establishment period (8-15 months). After which desire lines established by users will then describe the exact path edge and planting bed. Further amelioration of planting quantities will be judged based on widths of paths created by users. Furture maintainence will enhance sporatic established planting areas outside the formal planting bed border.

Digitalis ferruginea (Rusty foxglove) prefers a slightly acidic soil and a light canopy cover, but will tolerate alkaline soils and full sun. The basal leaves are attractive rosettes, mildly hardy. Here, a second planting of D. ferruginea in year two of establishment is recommended to ensure an annual flowering display of this species.

Sheringham, Coastal garden landscape plan & bloom schedule

The Coast Garden is reminiscent of calcareous grasslands, salt marsh, and woodland found along the North Norfolk Coast. The garden is the short grasslands that grow on the chalk escarpments found south of Sheringham; the swathes of sea lavender which follow you for miles at Stiffkey Saltmarsh; hedgerow & woodland edge, woody vegetation bounding the coast line delineating the wild and the tamed. It acts as a formalisation of the natural plant communities which thrive under harsh conditions living on the North Sea.

 

Repeating design elements cohesively narrate walking the Norfolk Coast Path.  Seating elements link the three sites along the coast path. 

Untreated Scottish larch timber boards provides a grey patina over time.  This material will age suitably into the North Norfolk coastal landscape.

Overstrand, 1:500

 

In the later part of the 19th century right up to the 1930’s Overstrand was the most fashionable place to be, especially in the warm months. It became known as an English beach resort for the wealthy and elite. Winston Churchill spent summers in Overstrand. It has a luxurious history, but also a fishing village history as well.

A linkage to the east of Overstrand at the site of the land slippage is quite narrow, slight, barely existent. The terrain allows users to traverse into the dip of the slippage for a few meters down and across. Stepping stones have been placed. A bridge, conceptually or actual is proposed for this site.

Plantings adding the coastal stabilisation is also proposed. Native trees are suggested to be planted into the concrete of the previous road, leading to the beach Promenade, will add a distinguished architecturally designed response to coastal erosion without engineering solutions.

At the east end of the Overstrand beach, where my design proposal lies, the site has been designated as an experimental coastal erosion defence site. The sea defences includes; riprap,a revetment and wooden groynes. The groynes themselves essentially take up Overstrand’s entire coastline. The coastline becomes non contiguous and is not easily accessible to all members of the public. Steep steps and stiles are the only way to traverse over or around the groynes themselves. They are probably the only particularly interesting designed engineering solution evident in this particular landscape.

Overstrand, Illustrative section

Overstrand's Clifton Way leading to Coast Road lost footing from land slippage at least twice in the last hundred years . The structural geology is ancient lake clays with staked glacial materials.  The fist occurrence devoured the remains of the Overstrand Hotel in 1947.  A sound slippage, a very active landslip, developed in the 1990s.  Geoengineered, stabilisation was fitted by regrading the slope and installing coastal defaces to protect the nearby residential cluster.  Bolstering the foot of the cliff with large rip rap laced at the bottom of the slope currently prevents free circulation across the beach, unless traversing at low tide.  The Overstrand to Walcott Site for Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) designated o this parcel is considered partially degraded due the coast erosion defences in place.

Linking very loosely Victorian invention and its ornate design sense, the function of a truss bridge as scaffolding is conceptually envisioned.  The stairs themselves are reminiscent of the previous topographical profile. 

Additionally, if substantial erosion continued to occur, the staircase would remain as an architectural relic denoting lines of the previous topography.  IT would remain as a function observation viewing platform.  Can Victorian engineering anticipate change in the temporality of the landscape and stifle function in future?  Does the ornate nature of the truss supports overemphasise the degree of certainty one needs to traverse the potential future promontory?

 

Yorkshire boarding is a typical cladding used for barns. The spacing is ideal for ventilation and light for farm animals. There are many farms in Norfolk so this makes a suitable choice blending with the working landscape vernacular. The transparency of the material due to the 50mm gaps in the cladding will take weight off the object. When the sun is heavy in the sky, the staircase will have the potential to be illuminated through the cladding.

Overstrand, View top formal garden

 The subject of walking has led me through the explorative measures of a design exercise focusing on the North Norfolk Coast. Under layers of Ramsar, Natura 2000, Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), National Nature Reserve, and Heritage Coastline, lie 3400 hectare of salt marsh, intertidal mud flats, young chalk and clay cliffs, and stony shingle beaches.  Choosing three small sites along this expanse allowed me to explore three different landscape typologies with a sought and determined cohesive design language.    The work was notioned to be particularly about ways to use and understand a site.  Therefore, the proposed interventions are meant to be intimate and at a human scale. This ensured an understanding between plan view and the walker perspective.  This design exercise also explored rural forms of walking and hiking and urban expressions of walking, historically seen in esplanades and boulevards.  Alice Foxley, formerly of Günther Vogt’s studio, described the “shape of the walk” – the journey, unfolding in linear time as moving…"representing origin, destination and station; approach, encounter, and departure; sequence and rhythm" in their 2012 publication,  Distance & Engagement.   This became an integral theoretical approach to my design exercise.  Additionally, Rebecca Solnit’s writings engaged me further into concepts of feminist theory on walking, personal freedom and expression in walking, as well as meditation and contemplation in walking – suitably addressed in her unpacking of Wordsworth.  Finally, I conceived through Richard Long's early works that history of personal landscape resonate appointed value in our collective memory of a site.  I was interested in approaching that as a design solution in celebration of working landscape and seaside found amongst the romantic solitude and landscape textures.   Five, six, pick up sticks, seven, eight, lay them straight  (1980) expresses a walks ability to mark history onto the land. Pathways and bridges, whether literally or symbolically, become principal unifying elements. With the use of boardwalk, steps, and viewing platforms – for nature observation and contemplation – a new landscape was formed, equally powerful in its intimacy as it is in its expansiveness and in its drama.    As I walk and will continue to walk through our regional landscapes, I hope to communicate geology, geography, ecology, time and distance to make "good work" as Long put, as the "right thing in the right places at the right time."  A crossing place, I interpret these thresholds, and the passage itself, just as I would the drawing on the page.
  Stiffkey 1:500      Stiffkey coastal salt marshes are considered to be the finest in Britain. It is just one piece in an important wetland complex of inter-tidal sand flats, mudflats, salt marshes, shingle banks, sand dunes, brackish lagoons and reed beds comprising the North Norfolk coastline. This ancient marsh is apart of an expansive coastal landscape under many layers of important protective conservation legislation. They include, but are not limited to: Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), Ramsar, Natura 2000, National Nature by the National Trust.   Stiffkey Saltmarshes is as imaginable —quite remote. An informal car park extends the edge of the marsh as Greenway, a small lane, terminates. Bird watchers can dominate the path, taking up the entire width of the path with photography equipment during high tide when access into the marsh is limited. A natural low ridge rising land between the marsh and the hedges of enclosed agricultural land beyond exists as a parcel just next to the entrance of the Stiffkey Saltmarsh car park.  An oak wood, Coneyford Plantation, appears on nineteenth century maps atop the southern most portion of this ridge. A stacked viewing platform built off the internal staircase is proposed utilsing this natural landform. From this vantage point, the extent of the boardwalk extending into the marsh following disused infrastructure can be seen.
  Stiffkey, Section through car park
  Sheringham 1:500   The design approach for the Sheringham site is pressed to keep an edge between where the coastal path meets The Esplanade. Its threshold is formalised with a long beech hedge. It is screened with the tall lines of  P. tremula  with anticipation of a gardens room for the lido, restored to a bathing facility.  As the walk on the coast path here is tight between hedges and cliff edge, between golf course and sea, views are obscured in places, expansive in others. Emerging from the hedge layer, a slight corner turned, a degree more inland, a sudden openness looking directly the lido. Exactly opposite of the Victorian modesty of bathing machines, a rambler enters this intimate moment.  An uncomfortable belly flop, smacking stomach to water. You cringe, but you laugh. Its a moment. A viewing platform directs you back to the sea. You are facing North. Its repose for the community who has not travelled far. We remind ourselves we live on an island.  Taller screens of beech hedge and aspen line the perimeter, pinching the threshold even tighter. The repetition of  P. tremula  ‘Erecta’ visually structures the walk’s transition into the municipal park. The rural walk has changed temperature. It is no longer remote. The walk is still between land and sea and bound to its edge; a slower walk occurs. Time and distance has changed. An extension at the lido suspends visitors over the beach. A return to the seaside, a viewing platform brings back vitality of the architectural relics of the Victorian age.  The coast garden has memorised its surrounding extent; its landscape. It transitions between the two prominent ecologies of the Norfolk coast. It changes from acid grassland and salt marsh to calcareous meadow.  Where the chalk surfaces, the meadow profits.
  Section, Section through restored lido and viewing platform   Sheringham’s coastal landscape is a working landscape. The Esplanade was built for leisure and recreation during the Victorian Age. With the series of groynes, shingle has accumulated and the cliff faces are most dramatically altered here.  The Norfolk Coast Path crosses the Esplanade and changes character dramatically at this threshold. From Sheringham to Cromer the walk switches from cliff walk to beach and diverts at places further away from the sea where development has cut contiguous crossing.
  Sheringham, Axonometric rendering   Sheringham, of medieval origins, is the train line terminus linking the coast to Norwich, the county’s urban core. It was once a small fishing village and now has grown to roughly 7,000. The municipal park in Sheringham at The Esplanade overlook links the three sites together as a destination place formalising the approaches to walking the coast and preserving the social and cultural heritages of the coastline villages.
  Sheringham, Coast garden and restored lido      Some walks are spent looking down.  Coast Garden is slowly decaying groynes delineating the horizonality of the sea landscape. It is driftwood. It is the stones you skip. The tired yawns of moorings. Steel in salt.  The combination of untreated larch timber planks, Corten corrugated weathering steel strips, and flint stones provide textural elements in the garden during dormant periods. They also function for the gardeners. Users may wander into the garden with use of these plank. This combination of materials provide architectural interest in the garden as well as utility. These elements are laid next between the borders of the calcareous grassland soil and the more acidic clay soils for the limonium planting and woodland. It is the washed beach.
  Sheringham, Coast garden plant schedule & soil construction   Broadcast seed for Gravel path as same method as Calcareous Grassland Seed Mix covering area closer to planting bed for sporatic gravel planting effect as roughly shown on plan. Gravel path inaccessible during growth establishment period (8-15 months). After which desire lines established by users will then describe the exact path edge and planting bed. Further amelioration of planting quantities will be judged based on widths of paths created by users. Furture maintainence will enhance sporatic established planting areas outside the formal planting bed border.   Digitalis ferruginea  (Rusty foxglove) prefers a slightly acidic soil and a light canopy cover, but will tolerate alkaline soils and full sun. The basal leaves are attractive rosettes, mildly hardy. Here, a second planting of  D. ferruginea  in year two of establishment is recommended to ensure an annual flowering display of this species.
  Sheringham, Coastal garden landscape plan & bloom schedule   The Coast Garden is reminiscent of calcareous grasslands, salt marsh, and woodland found along the North Norfolk Coast. The garden is the short grasslands that grow on the chalk escarpments found south of Sheringham; the swathes of sea lavender which follow you for miles at Stiffkey Saltmarsh; hedgerow & woodland edge, woody vegetation bounding the coast line delineating the wild and the tamed. It acts as a formalisation of the natural plant communities which thrive under harsh conditions living on the North Sea.
    Repeating design elements cohesively narrate walking the Norfolk Coast Path.  Seating elements link the three sites along the coast path.   Untreated Scottish larch timber boards provides a grey patina over time.  This material will age suitably into the North Norfolk coastal landscape.
construction_drawing3.jpg
  Overstrand, 1:500      In the later part of the 19th century right up to the 1930’s Overstrand was the most fashionable place to be, especially in the warm months. It became known as an English beach resort for the wealthy and elite. Winston Churchill spent summers in Overstrand. It has a luxurious history, but also a fishing village history as well.  A linkage to the east of Overstrand at the site of the land slippage is quite narrow, slight, barely existent. The terrain allows users to traverse into the dip of the slippage for a few meters down and across. Stepping stones have been placed. A bridge, conceptually or actual is proposed for this site.  Plantings adding the coastal stabilisation is also proposed. Native trees are suggested to be planted into the concrete of the previous road, leading to the beach Promenade, will add a distinguished architecturally designed response to coastal erosion without engineering solutions.  At the east end of the Overstrand beach, where my design proposal lies, the site has been designated as an experimental coastal erosion defence site. The sea defences includes; riprap,a revetment and wooden groynes. The groynes themselves essentially take up Overstrand’s entire coastline. The coastline becomes non contiguous and is not easily accessible to all members of the public. Steep steps and stiles are the only way to traverse over or around the groynes themselves. They are probably the only particularly interesting designed engineering solution evident in this particular landscape.
  Overstrand, Illustrative section
 Overstrand's Clifton Way leading to Coast Road lost footing from land slippage at least twice in the last hundred years . The structural geology is ancient lake clays with staked glacial materials.  The fist occurrence devoured the remains of the Overstrand Hotel in 1947.  A sound slippage, a very active landslip, developed in the 1990s.  Geoengineered, stabilisation was fitted by regrading the slope and installing coastal defaces to protect the nearby residential cluster.  Bolstering the foot of the cliff with large rip rap laced at the bottom of the slope currently prevents free circulation across the beach, unless traversing at low tide.  The Overstrand to Walcott Site for Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) designated o this parcel is considered partially degraded due the coast erosion defences in place.  Linking very loosely Victorian invention and its ornate design sense, the function of a truss bridge as scaffolding is conceptually envisioned.  The stairs themselves are reminiscent of the previous topographical profile.   Additionally, if substantial erosion continued to occur, the staircase would remain as an architectural relic denoting lines of the previous topography.  IT would remain as a function observation viewing platform.  Can Victorian engineering anticipate change in the temporality of the landscape and stifle function in future?  Does the ornate nature of the truss supports overemphasise the degree of certainty one needs to traverse the potential future promontory?
    Yorkshire boarding is a typical cladding used for barns. The spacing is ideal for ventilation and light for farm animals. There are many farms in Norfolk so this makes a suitable choice blending with the working landscape vernacular. The transparency of the material due to the 50mm gaps in the cladding will take weight off the object. When the sun is heavy in the sky, the staircase will have the potential to be illuminated through the cladding.
  Overstrand, View top formal garden